Calendar

Session schedule

All sessions meet in AP&M B412 at the UCSD campus (click here for maps and directions) run according to the following approximate schedule:

8:30 a.m.

Doors open

8:30 a.m.—9:00 a.m.

Enjoy a complimentary light breakfast (bagels, muffins, fruit, juice, coffee)

9:00 a.m.—9:55 a.m.

Session  1

9:55 a.m.— 10:05 a.m.

Break

10:05 a.m.—11:00 a.m.

Session 2

11:00 a.m.—11:15 a.m.

Wrap-up

Date

Time

Location

Topic

Discussion leader

RSVP

Handouts

10/04/14

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Prime Numbers

David Patrick

 

Estimathon

Primes

11/15/14

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Volumes Making Full (Math Teachers') Circle

Yana Mohanty

 

Volumes Making Full Circle

12/06/14

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Great Expectations

James Fung and Shannon Rogers

 

Great Expectations

02/07/15

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Liar’s Bingo and Other Mathematical Magic

David Patrick

 

Math Magic

Liar’s Bingo  Cards

03/07/15

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Problem Posing

David Quarfoot

 

Presentation

The problems you posed

04/18/15

8:30 -11:00 am

UCSD, AP&M B412

Your questions about the Mystery Geometrical Objects (a.k.a. spheroids that Dave Honda made for us)

Yana Mohanty

 

Presentation

Problem Handout

Answer key

 

San Diego

Math Teachers’

Circle

Past years’ calendars and handouts are available at the links below.

Brief session Descriptions

Text Box: Prime Numbers										October 4, 2014
We'll start the new school year with a fun group contest -- and yes, there will be prizes! Then, on to the main topic of the day: prime numbers. The primes are the building blocks of the positive integers, but how much do you really know about them? We'll explore some surprising facts about prime numbers. You're sure to learn something new about the primes that you can take back to your school and amaze your students!  
Text Box: Volumes Making Full (Math Teachers') Circle 		      			      November 15, 2014
We will present an example of how a discussion between teacher and mathematician found its way into the teacher's classroom. Cynthia's mention of many teachers' concern with teaching volumes inspired Yana to lead a session on volumes last year. Cynthia then successfully used some of the ideas from that session in her classroom. Cynthia's description of the challenges her students faced with volumes got Yana thinking about some more volume problems that may help teachers in the classroom. These problems will be presented in this session. We will go over some ideas covered in last year's volume session, but last year's session on volumes is NOT a prerequisite for this one. If you have used some ideas from the Math Teachers Circle in your classroom on any topic, we'd love to hear from you, too!
Text Box: Great Expectations 	      			       				        December 6, 2014
We will explore the probability concept of expected value.  Expected value, by extracting a sort of average from an event, gives us a number with which to analyze situations involving uncertainty and so make decisions.  We will explore expected value and related concepts through problems, games, and real-world examples.  This is the companion talk to the Two-Player Games talk last year, but attendance of that session is not required. 
Text Box: Liar's Bingo and Other Mathematical Magic       			       		February 7, 2015
I’ll present some mathematical magic tricks, and your job will be to figure out how they work. We'll start with Liar's Bingo, in which I'll magically be able to tell what number on your bingo card you're lying about. Then we'll see some card tricks and other feats of magic (or luck), but of course there's no "magic" involved -- it's just math! (Well, maybe a little trickery too.) We'll learn some combinatorics along the way, and when we're through, you'll be able to go back to your school and amaze your students with your psychic powers.
Please bring a deck of cards with you if you have one (though we'll have extras).
Text Box: Problem Posing 			       							    March 7, 2015
When is the last time your students solved a problem that wasn’t posed by a textbook, teacher, or test?  Far too often, students move through the educational system and are never given the opportunity to ask their own mathematical questions.  In this session, we explore the idea of “problem posing”, a classroom technique that gives students the chance to ask (and answer) the questions.  Beyond its novelty, this technique has the power to increase interest levels, promote equity, develop inquisitiveness, and foster creativity. 
Text Box: Your Questions About the Mystery Geometry Objects 			       	     April 18, 2015
During the last session, the participants asked a number of intriguing questions about the Mystery Geometrical Objects that David Honda had made for us. These questions explored everything from the amount of paper used to build the objects to the shapes needed to build the objects to their surface area, and much more. In this session, we will look into these questions and try to answer them.  The questions can all be found on the last page of the presentation on 3/7/15 , so attendance of the previous session is NOT a prerequisite for this session.

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014